Tips for Going Back to School from Home

Tools you need for learning from home include laptop, earphones, pens and pencils

For most of us, school is back in session and for many, remote learning is the new norm. Here are some things you can do to help set up your at-home students for success.

Reading, ‘Riting, Re-boots & Routine

  • Create a daily schedule to include class times and assignment deadlines; outdoor activity and lunch breaks; homework; social (distance) time with friends; and family time.
  • Get everyone up in time to eat breakfast and dress for school. (No pjs allowed.)
  • Before class starts, give them one simple chore to do (make the bed, take out the trash) to get them in the right mindset for completing the day’s online assignments.
  • Multiple learners at home? Check to ensure there’s enough internet bandwidth to handle multiple devices streaming at the same time. 

Personalized Learning Pods

  • A cool, personalized workspace helps with concentration. Get creative! Set up a desk in their bedroom, a card table in the living room, or separate spaces with a DIY cardboard ‘cubicle,’ blanket fort, or these very cool custom panel track window treatments to create individual spaces and classrooms.
Architect Panel-track-room-divider.jpg

Practical and pretty panel track blinds aren’t just for windows and patio doors. Hang them from the ceiling to create more privacy and separate spaces anywhere in your home.

  • Have all the necessary school supplies they need handy so no excuses for getting up and looking for something in the middle of class. 
  • Try to find a space that’s free of distractions, noise and clutter.
  • Make sure there’s easy access to a power source to keep tablets and laptops charged.
  • Proper lighting is important. Adjust blinds and shades throughout the day and position monitors away from windows to reduce glare and keep your child from turning into a shadow when on screen.

Student-at-home-desk-1024x685.png

Stay in Touch with Teachers

  • Watch for emails, check homework hotlines, and call or text if you have any questions about assignments.
  • Check state and local school district websites for updates and available assistance and resources to help you and your children while attending school from home. 

Keep Tabs on Progress

  • Familiarize yourself with the remote platform and course modules your child’s school are using.
  • Most remote learning platforms don’t allow outside email or instant messaging. If you’re working at home (or at the office), too, and want to check on your child’s progress during school time without interrupting a lesson, try an app such as FB for Kids or Slack so they can chat with you outside of their school account.

Female Asian student-at-desk.png

Safety First 

  • Check privacy and security settings so your child’s profiles are set to the strictest privacy setting, and check the safety and security settings on anything that’s newly downloaded. 
  • If using video-conferencing, think about what children, especially young teens, are wearing.
  • If available, apply settings to blur the background or enable a different background so you’re not “inviting” people into your child’s personal space.
  • If you or your child are uncomfortable using video, find out if they can get sufficient instruction via audio or chat. And if something coming into your home from school just feels wrong or inappropriate, contact the school and let them know.