The Time Is Now to Prepare for Daylight Saving 2019

Analog clock showing 2:00 on daylight savings time 2019

Full disclosure: Being that we are based out of Arizona, the concept of Daylight Saving Time is kind of lost with us.

Yet, while most of us (the Navajo Nation not included) in this state will not be doing anything with our clocks Sunday, we understand that pretty much the rest of the country will be adjusting to their new reality on Sunday.

For at 2:00 a.m. on  March 10, 2019, clocks will need to turn ahead to 3:00 a.m. Fare thee well, hour.

While we cannot necessarily understand your plight, we can at least empathize with the difficulty that comes with the time changing.  It doesn’t take too much thought to figure out some ways it could be problematic.

The first one most of us think about, most likely, is running late for something because you forgot to change the clock.

That’s no doubt an issue for many, but that’s not the only thing that comes from the switch.

Besides messing with punctuality, Daylight Saving Time could  also be bad for your health.

Back in March 2018, CNN posted a story about how the time switch can cause all sorts of problems. Who  knew?

According to the article, a 2016 study discovered the rate for having a stroke increased by 8% in the two  days following the time change. Of that percentage, cancer patients were 25% more likely to suffer a stroke and people older than 65 about 20% more likely.

Interestingly, those are not the only issues that arise from needing to rise an hour earlier.

A 2012 study by the University of Alabama at Birmingham discovered the Monday and Tuesday following the “spring forward” switch were associated with a 10% increase in the risk of having a heart attack. Conversely, the risk decreases by the same amount when it is time to “fall back.”

Taking the time to think about it, those conclusions actually make a lot of sense.

Suddenly losing an hour of sleep is not a good thing. Numerous studies have shown how lack of sleep leads to weight gain, which then increases the chances for something like a heart attack, other heart ailments and diabetes.

There is also the issue of messing with one’s circadian rhythm. Not to be confused with the cicada bug, which is kind of freaky but doesn’t do much for your health one way or another, the circadian rhythm (or clock) is pretty important.

At a base level, it is simply the concept of how your body understands and adjusts to time at a biological level. Being ready to do certain things, like wake up or go to sleep, doesn’t just happen because we want it to.

It takes some programming, so suddenly switching things up can be a real jolt to the system. Now,  the good news is that our bodies will eventually adjust to the new reality, but the time before it does may lead to a ride on the struggle bus.

None of this is to say it is impossible to survive the time change. We’re going to assume you’ve been through this before, which means you have found ways to persevere.

We’re proud of you.

But if you are new to it all or are hoping to find some tips to make it less awful, the study by UAB also provided some ideas to help your body adjust more quickly.

Some of them are less pleasant, such as waking up a half-hour earlier than you need to on Saturday and Sunday in preparation for that Monday start time, while others — like eating a decent-sized breakfast — are more palatable.

It is also recommended that you go outside in the sunlight early in the morning and/or do some a.m. exercising over the weekend.

Do all of that, it is noted in the study, and your body will be better prepared for the sudden shift. And the more prepared you are, the less likely you are to experience any health-related issues due to the change.

Of course, if none of that works for you, there’s always the option to move to Arizona, though we don’t necessarily advise that now since summer is just around the corner.